Interventional Procedures

Interventional procedures involve the treatment of a variety of conditions in a minimally invasive manner.  The best known of these procedures is the dilatation or placing of a stent (coil) in a narrowed artery, to re-establish good circulation. For example, narrowed arteries of the legs that are causing pain in the legs upon exercise or walking can potentially be treated this way.

Angiography

Biopsy

Facet block

Myelography

Angiography

Angiography is a common interventional radiology procedure that can help doctors diagnose blockages, bleeding or other disorders in blood vessels throughout the body. During an angiogram, the radiologist inserts a tiny catheter into a blood vessel using a minute puncture in your skin, then injects a dye to make the blood vessels visible during a special type of X-ray called fluoroscopy.

Catheter Angiography:

Biopsy

biopsy is a procedure to remove a piece of tissue or a sample of cells from a patient’s body so that it can be analysed in a laboratory.

Stereotactic Breast

Lumps or abnormalities in the breast are often detected by physical examination, mammography, or other imaging studies. However, it is not always possible to tell from these imaging tests whether a growth is benign or cancerous.

A stereotactic breast biopsy is performed when a mammogram shows a breast abnormality such as:

  • a suspicious solid mass
  • micro-calcifications (a tiny cluster of small calcium deposits)
  • a distortion in the structure of the breast tissue
  • an area of abnormal tissue change
  • a new mass or area of calcium deposits is present at a previous surgery site.

Stereotactic breast biopsy uses mammography to help pinpoint the spot in the breast that needs to be removed.

Available at:  Panorama

Ultrasound guided biopsy:

Image-guided biopsy is performed by taking samples of an abnormality under some form of guidance such as ultrasound, MRI or mammographic guidance.

In ultrasound-guided breast biopsy, ultrasound imaging is used to help guide the radiologist's instruments to the site of the abnormal growth.

An ultrasound-guided breast biopsy can be performed when a breast ultrasound shows an abnormality such as:

  • a suspicious solid mass
  • a distortion in the structure of the breast tissue
  • an area of abnormal tissue change

Available at:  Panorama, Cape Gate, Louis Leipoldt, Durbanville, Vredenburg, Paarl

Fine needle aspiration biopsy

Nodules or abnormalities in the body are often detected by imaging examinations.  However, it is not always possible to tell from these imaging tests whether a nodule is benign (non-cancerous) or cancerous.

A needle biopsy, also called a needle aspiration, involves removing some cells—in a less invasive procedure involving a hollow needle—from a suspicious area within the body and examining them under a microscope to determine a diagnosis.

Available at:  Panorama, Cape Gate, Louis Leipoldt, Durbanville, Vredenburg, Paarl

Facet Block

A Facet Block is an anaesthetic or anti-inflammatory injection targeted toward a certain nerve or group of nerves to treat pain.  The purpose of the injection is to "turn off" a pain signal coming from a specific location in the body or to decrease inflammation in that area.

People who suffer from either acute or chronic pain might have a Facet Block injection to achieve temporary pain relief.  Often, such pain originates from the spine, but other areas commonly affected include the neck, buttocks, legs and arms.  Delivering a Facet block injection allows a damaged nerve time to heal itself from a state of constant irritation.  Additionally, Facet blocks can provide diagnostic information to the doctor.  By performing a Facet block and then monitoring how the patient responds to the injection, the doctor can often use this information to help determine the cause or source of the pain.

Imaging guidance, such as fluoroscopy or computed tomography (CT or "CAT" scan), may be used to help the doctor place the needle in exactly the right location so that the patient can receive maximum benefit from the injection.

Available at:  Panorama, Cape Gate, Louis Leipoldt, Durbanville, Vredenburg, Paarl

Myelography

Myelography is an imaging examination that involves the introduction of a spinal needle into the spinal canal and the injection of contrast material in the space around the spinal cord and nerve roots (the subarachnoid space) using a real-time form of X-ray called fluoroscopy. Followed by a CT examination. Myelography (Myelogram) is a diagnostic examination of the spine. A special X-ray sensitive contrast dye is injected to illuminate the spine, allowing identification of problems within the spine, spinal cord and nerve roots.

Available at: Panorama, Cape Gate, Louis Leipoldt, Durbanville, Vredenburg, Paarl

Lumbar Myelography

  • Patient will be admitted as a day patient
  • After the examination: patient must lie on their back for 4-6 hours with the head slightly elevated